Category: About The Book

About The Book

Interview: IPv6 Buzz Podcast Episode 53 – Applications and IPv6

Image for IPv6 Buzz podcast episode 53

What is the current state of application support for IPv6? What are challenges for applications migrating to IPv6, particularly for enterprise applications? What am I doing at the Internet Society with projects such as Open Standards Everywhere to promote IPv6?

I had the fun of being interviewed by Scott Hogg and Tom Coffeen on their IPv6 Buzz Podcast episode 53 to talk about all of this and more. You can listen here:

Thanks to Scott and Tom, as well as their other host Ed Horley, for having me on the show to geek out about IPv6. Please do give the show a listen – and send along any questions you may have. Thanks!

Interview: IPv6 Buzz Podcast Episode 53 – Applications and IPv6

Image for IPv6 Buzz podcast episode 53

What is the current state of application support for IPv6? What are challenges for applications migrating to IPv6, particularly for enterprise applications? What am I doing at the Internet Society with projects such as Open Standards Everywhere to promote IPv6?

I had the fun of being interviewed by Scott Hogg and Tom Coffeen on their IPv6 Buzz Podcast episode 53 to talk about all of this and more. You can listen here:

Thanks to Scott and Tom, as well as their other host Ed Horley, for having me on the show to geek out about IPv6. Please do give the show a listen – and send along any questions you may have. Thanks!

Getting Close To Making Book Available on GitHub

With the changes to the book and my plans to develop a Second Edition, I also want to change the toolchain I’m using. When I wrote the book for O’Reilly back in 2011, I used DocBook XML as the source. However, these days I’m typically working in Markdown or another lightweight text markup format. So step one for the Second Edition is to migrate the DocBook XML into another format.

My current thinking is to use AsciiDoc, as it has support for footnotes and admonitions (ex. “Warning”), neither of which are supported in most Markdown variants. I’m still working through some plans, but hope to have the book converted over in the next few weeks. (I would welcome feedback on other text formats.)

I’m planning to make the book text available in a GitHub repository so that others can see the text and perhaps offer comments and feedback. If you would like to be notified when I do that, please sign up on my email list.

Getting Close To Making Book Available on GitHub

With the changes to the book and my plans to develop a Second Edition, I also want to change the toolchain I’m using. When I wrote the book for O’Reilly back in 2011, I used DocBook XML as the source. However, these days I’m typically working in Markdown or another lightweight text markup format. So step one for the Second Edition is to migrate the DocBook XML into another format.

My current thinking is to use AsciiDoc, as it has support for footnotes and admonitions (ex. “Warning”), neither of which are supported in most Markdown variants. I’m still working through some plans, but hope to have the book converted over in the next few weeks. (I would welcome feedback on other text formats.)

I’m planning to make the book text available in a GitHub repository so that others can see the text and perhaps offer comments and feedback. If you would like to be notified when I do that, please sign up on my email list.

Slides – VT CodeCamp Presentation about Why App Developers Should Care about IPv6

Yesterday (Sept 28, 2019) at Vermont CodeCamp 11 in Burlington, VT, I gave a talk titled “Yes, IPv6 is Real! How To Make Your Apps Work (And Be As Fast As Possible) ” with the abstract:

How well do your applications or websites work over IPv6? As the world runs out of IPv4 addresses, new mobile networks are being deployed as “IPv6-only” with IPv6-to-IPv4 gateways at the edge of those networks. The result is that apps and sites that work natively over IPv6 will be faster for users than apps and sites stuck on only IPv4. Many leading services have already made this transition, and Apple now requires IPv6 for all apps in their AppStore. In this session, you’ll learn about tips and tools to successfully migrate your applications and sites to work over both IPv4 and IPv6.

It was an enjoyable session with a good number of questions from the participants. The slides are available on SlideShare at:

Thank you to the VT Code Camp organizers for accepting my proposal to speak – and for all the participants in the session for the attention and questions. I hope I helped some of them understand a bit more of why they should make sure their apps work over IPv6 – and how to get started!

P.S. If you’d like someone to speak on this topic at a conference or event you are organizing, please do contact me.

Slides – VT CodeCamp Presentation about Why App Developers Should Care about IPv6

Yesterday (Sept 28, 2019) at Vermont CodeCamp 11 in Burlington, VT, I gave a talk titled “Yes, IPv6 is Real! How To Make Your Apps Work (And Be As Fast As Possible) ” with the abstract:

How well do your applications or websites work over IPv6? As the world runs out of IPv4 addresses, new mobile networks are being deployed as “IPv6-only” with IPv6-to-IPv4 gateways at the edge of those networks. The result is that apps and sites that work natively over IPv6 will be faster for users than apps and sites stuck on only IPv4. Many leading services have already made this transition, and Apple now requires IPv6 for all apps in their AppStore. In this session, you’ll learn about tips and tools to successfully migrate your applications and sites to work over both IPv4 and IPv6.

It was an enjoyable session with a good number of questions from the participants. The slides are available on SlideShare at:

Thank you to the VT Code Camp organizers for accepting my proposal to speak – and for all the participants in the session for the attention and questions. I hope I helped some of them understand a bit more of why they should make sure their apps work over IPv6 – and how to get started!

P.S. If you’d like someone to speak on this topic at a conference or event you are organizing, please do contact me.

Big Change – “Migrating Apps To IPv6” no longer published by O’Reilly – new Second Edition planned for 2020

There has been a big change with the book. About a year ago I approached my editor at O’Reilly about creating a second edition of the book. It turned out that because the book hadn’t really ever sold well (more on that below), they were no longer interested in carrying the book. They were, however, willing to revert the copyright and all content to me (except for the cover art and their branding, of course). This was actually fine by me and so we parted amicably.

I am immensely grateful to O’Reilly for publishing the first edition of this book! As people who have read the book know, the book emerged out of a proposal to speak at the OSCON 2011 conference. I thank the whole team at O’Reilly for all their help in making this book happen.

What’s Next?

I’m now planning a Second Edition of the book, with the plan to simply self-publish through one of the various publishing platforms (most likely Amazon, but we’ll see). The goal will be to publish sometime in 2020.

I am also planning to make all of the content freely available in a git repository. It won’t be on Github, because that site only works over IPv4. I’m looking into several Gitlab installations that do work over IPv6.

Along the way I’ll be converting the text from DocBook XML to Markdown, updating a good number of the links, and making a number of other changes.

I am very excited about this change. One of the issues I had with the First Edition (and the major critique in any reviews) was that the book was priced at $24.99. This was not MY choice. In a traditional publishing relationship, the publisher sets the price. The author has no control over this. I always felt this was too high for the small size of the book. Now, I can set a more appropriate price. I can also make the content available for free, as I mentioned above.

If you are interested in receiving updates about the Second Edition as I move forward with it, please fill out this short form.

Thanks to everyone who has helped with the book over the years. Thank you again to everyone at O’Reilly who helped make this book happen.

Now… on to the Second Edition!

Big Change – “Migrating Apps To IPv6” no longer published by O’Reilly – new Second Edition planned for 2020

There has been a big change with the book. About a year ago I approached my editor at O’Reilly about creating a second edition of the book. It turned out that because the book hadn’t really ever sold well (more on that below), they were no longer interested in carrying the book. They were, however, willing to revert the copyright and all content to me (except for the cover art and their branding, of course). This was actually fine by me and so we parted amicably.

I am immensely grateful to O’Reilly for publishing the first edition of this book! As people who have read the book know, the book emerged out of a proposal to speak at the OSCON 2011 conference. I thank the whole team at O’Reilly for all their help in making this book happen.

What’s Next?

I’m now planning a Second Edition of the book, with the plan to simply self-publish through one of the various publishing platforms (most likely Amazon, but we’ll see). The goal will be to publish sometime in 2020.

I am also planning to make all of the content freely available in a git repository. It won’t be on Github, because that site only works over IPv4. I’m looking into several Gitlab installations that do work over IPv6.

Along the way I’ll be converting the text from DocBook XML to Markdown, updating a good number of the links, and making a number of other changes.

I am very excited about this change. One of the issues I had with the First Edition (and the major critique in any reviews) was that the book was priced at $24.99. This was not MY choice. In a traditional publishing relationship, the publisher sets the price. The author has no control over this. I always felt this was too high for the small size of the book. Now, I can set a more appropriate price. I can also make the content available for free, as I mentioned above.

If you are interested in receiving updates about the Second Edition as I move forward with it, please fill out this short form.

Thanks to everyone who has helped with the book over the years. Thank you again to everyone at O’Reilly who helped make this book happen.

Now… on to the Second Edition!

Updating the site – and deleting old posts

With some impending changes related to the book, I am cleaning up the site to remove some of the older information. For example, I am removing blog posts related to old sales from many years ago. The one down side to this is that links in old social media posts may not all work. However, an archive of the site is available:

Updating the site – and deleting old posts

With some impending changes related to the book, I am cleaning up the site to remove some of the older information. For example, I am removing blog posts related to old sales from many years ago. The one down side to this is that links in old social media posts may not all work. However, an archive of the site is available: