Category: Case Studies

Case Studies

How Did Estonia Grow From Near 0% IPv6 To 8% In 7 Months?

How did the country of Estonia grow from close to 0% IPv6 deployment to almost 8% in about 7 months?  What did the network operators there do?  By way of a tweet today we learned that RIPE Labs published this great IPv6 case study about the Estonian growth. The story also includes this impressive chart from Akamai’s State of the Internet report:

Estonia IPv6 growth

That shows the growth of IPv6 usage through March 2015 – and today Google’s IPv6 statistics put Estonian usage at 7.75% (as of June 2, 2015) and APNIC’s IPv6 stats show the country hitting over 8% in late May 2015:

Estonian IPv6 usageSooo… how did they do this?

Well, we should really direct you to the APNIC Labs guest post from Tarko Tikan of Estonian Telecom:

and also his recent presentation, “Enabling and Securing IPv6 in Service Provider Networks “:

A couple of high-level points I took away from the material:

  • They did not try to justify the IPv6 deployment on its own – instead they folded it into a planned project to replace their broadband network gateway (BNG).
  • They made sure they had a fall-back mechanism in place so that customers would not notice any issues with IPv6.
  • They paid a great amount of attention to the customer premises equipment (CPE) and rolled out IPv6-capable CPE in advance of the deployment.
  • They used access control lists (ACLs) to be able to limit and then quickly open up IPv6 deployment to different parts of their network.

Tarko provides some great statistics in his APNIC post:

As for the statistics, we have a total of 250,000 subscribers in our network. We have 38,000+ active IPv6 subscribers (almost 15% of our customer base). Eighty-one percent of these have at least one IPv6-enabled device in the LAN and 70% have more than one.

Again, the article and video provide more information.  Kudos to APNIC Labs for publishing it and for Tarko Tikan for providing the information.

If you want to get your network operating with IPv6, please visit our Start Here page to begin! Consider joining Estonian Telecom and the many other service providers who have made the move to IPv6!

P.S. If you are network operator and enable IPv6, why not join the World IPv6 Launch measurements effort so that your network will appear in our monthly IPv6 measurements?

 

 

Facebook Launches IPv6-Only Data Cluster

If you are a Facebook user and are also interested in using IPv6 wherever possible, Facebook’s Paul Saab just announced yesterday that there is now a special link where you can connect to Facebook’s IPv6-ONLY data cluster. In the IPv6 group on Facebook (of course!) he posted:

Back in March I announced we were working towards having IPv6-only clusters. I’m happy to announce that we’ve successfully launched our latest cluster as IPv6-only. If you want to make sure that you’re using the IPv6-only cluster, we’ve redirected traffic for http://www.v6.facebook.com/ so that it uses it

Just to be 100% clear, you have been able to access Facebook over IPv6 ever since World IPv6 Launch back in 2012 just by going to the regular http://www.facebook.com/ URL.  Users of the IPvFoo/IPvFox browser add-ons have been able to see that we’ve been connecting to Facebook over IPv6.  It’s all worked great.

However, while the connection to the main Facebook page has been over IPv6, that page has also still required some connections over the legacy IPv4 network.

With yesterday’s news from Paul Saab, those of us who want to truly do everything over IPv6 can now do so by connecting to http://www.v6.facebook.com/. Admittedly, this may only be of interest to those of us who are advocates of IPv6, but still, it’s pretty cool to have full access to a major site like Facebook entirely over IPv6!

You may recall that back in March, Paul Saab gave an excellent presentation about how Facebook is moving to entirely using IPv6 within their internal networks.

fb-internal-ipv6

 

His slides are available and you’ll note that on his second to last slide he wrote:

  • Plans for first IPv6 only cluster (no RFC1918) by end of 2014

This news yesterday is the completion of those plans (and well before the end of 2014, too!).

Kudos to Paul and his team at Facebook – it’s great to see this work happening and to have a way we can work with Facebook in pure IPv6-only network. Thanks!

What are you waiting for?  Visit our “Start Here” page to find resources available to help you make the move to IPv6 – and let us know if there is anything more we can do to help you!

New IPv6 Case Studies Out… But None From Application Developers!

World Ipv6 LaunchAs part of my job at the Internet Society Deploy360 Programme, we recently published a whole new batch of IPv6 case studies during the 2nd “Launchiversary” of World IPv6 Launch. However, if you scan down that list of case studies you’ll see one interesting omission:

There are NO case studies from application developers!

None. Zilch. Zero.

This needs to change!  If you are an application developer and have migrated your application over to work on IPv6, my colleagues and I at the Internet Society would love to write up a bit about what you have done.  PLEASE CONTACT US!

It doesn’t have to be anything gigantic.  It could just be a simple article explaining what you did to make your application work over IPv6.  Or it could be a paragraph linking to a video of a presentation you gave or a set of slides.  We are glad to “interview” you, too, via email or a voice/video call to capture information that we will then write up.  All we need is your interest and willingness to be included.  Please do let us know.

Separately from that, I am still interested in including some case studies in the next version of this “Migrating Applications To IPv6” book that I’m targeting for early 2015.  I have a list of questions that I’d like to ask some of you and include in the book. The benefit to other developers will be that they will get to learn about how to move to IPv6 based on your experience. The benefit to you is that I’ll mention your application and name and give you the added publicity from being in the book.  The benefit to the Internet is that we’ll get more people moving over to IPv6 sooner rather than later!  If you are interested in being considered for the book, please contact me directly!

New IPv6 Case Studies Out… But None From Application Developers!

World Ipv6 LaunchAs part of my job at the Internet Society Deploy360 Programme, we recently published a whole new batch of IPv6 case studies during the 2nd “Launchiversary” of World IPv6 Launch. However, if you scan down that list of case studies you’ll see one interesting omission:

There are NO case studies from application developers!

None. Zilch. Zero.

This needs to change!  If you are an application developer and have migrated your application over to work on IPv6, my colleagues and I at the Internet Society would love to write up a bit about what you have done.  PLEASE CONTACT US!

It doesn’t have to be anything gigantic.  It could just be a simple article explaining what you did to make your application work over IPv6.  Or it could be a paragraph linking to a video of a presentation you gave or a set of slides.  We are glad to “interview” you, too, via email or a voice/video call to capture information that we will then write up.  All we need is your interest and willingness to be included.  Please do let us know.

Separately from that, I am still interested in including some case studies in the next version of this “Migrating Applications To IPv6” book that I’m targeting for early 2015.  I have a list of questions that I’d like to ask some of you and include in the book. The benefit to other developers will be that they will get to learn about how to move to IPv6 based on your experience. The benefit to you is that I’ll mention your application and name and give you the added publicity from being in the book.  The benefit to the Internet is that we’ll get more people moving over to IPv6 sooner rather than later!  If you are interested in being considered for the book, please contact me directly!

Case Study: IPv6 At The U.S. Census Bureau

The United States Census Bureau is one of the leading implementors of IPv6 within the U.S. government. Charles Sun, IPv6 Transition Manager for the U.S. Census Bureau, provided us with information noting:

  • On September 28, 2012, U. S. Census Bureau was the first agency – Operating Unit (OU) within U. S. Department of Commerce to be in full compliance of the U.S. OMB mandate for IPv6 transition Phase I (September 30, 2012);
  • The U.S. Census Bureau is currently on track to complete the second phase of the U.S. OMB mandate to enable all internal agency users to be able to access Internet related services from our internal enterprise network by September 30, 2014 so as to be in full compliance with the U.S. OMB mandate based on the U.S. federal government initial IPv6 transition initiative.

Charles also pointed to two sources of IPv6 statistics:

Charles also wrote a personal opinion article on global IPv6 adoption titled “Stop using Internet Protocol Version 4!” that is available (with registration) at ComputerWorld, CIO.com and other related sites.


Please visit our IPv6 Case Studies page for more examples of IPv6 deployment. If you would like to get started with IPv6, please visit our IPv6 resources or begin with our “Start Here” page to help find resources most appropriate for your type of organization. If you have an IPv6 case study you think we should consider for inclusion on our site, please contact us – we are always looking for more!


Case Study: Facebook Moving To An IPv6-Only Internal Network

At the 2014 v6 World Congress in Paris, Facebook’s Paul Saab outlined how Facebook is well on the path toward moving to an IPv6-only internal network. He makes the point that why should you deal with the headache of maintaining a dual-stack (IPv4/IPv6)? Instead just move your internal network to be IPv6-only and then have dual-stack devices on the edge of the network to interact with the legacy IPv4 Internet.  He also walks through the challenges Facebook faced with regard to vendor equipment, software applications and also with the issue that many developers continued to write IPv4-only code. (A clever solution: simply remove IPv4 from the developer’s machines!)

You can download a copy of the slides (and view commentary in the IPv6 Group on Facebook) to read all about the process, but here’s the key summary slide 31:

fb-internal-ipv6

Those statistics are:

  • 100% of  hosts they care about respond on IPv6  (Hosts that are not IPv6 ready are going away.)
  • 75% of internal traffic is now IPv6 with a goal to be at 100% by Q3 2014 or earlier
  • 98% of traffic in and out of HHVM is IPv6
  • 100% of our memcache traffic is IPv6
  • A goal of being 100% IPv6-only in 2-3 years

Very impressive to see!  All in all a great document for anyone seeking to understand the challenges that an online service may face when moving to IPv6 – and how to overcome those challenges!


Please visit our IPv6 Case Studies page for more examples of IPv6 deployment. If you would like to get started with IPv6, please visit our IPv6 resources or begin with our “Start Here” page to help find resources most appropriate for your type of organization. If you have an IPv6 case study you think we should consider for inclusion on our site, please contact us – we are always looking for more!


Facebook Moving To An IPv6-Only Internal Network

In a brilliant presentation by Facebook’s Paul Saab at the recent v6 World Congress in Paris, he outlined how Facebook is well on the path toward moving to an IPv6-only internal network. He makes the point that why should you deal with the headache of maintaining a dual-stack (IPv4/IPv6). Instead just move your internal network to be IPv6-only and then have dual-stack devices on the edge of the network to interact with the legacy IPv4 Internet. You can download a copy of the slides (and view commentary in the IPv6 Group on Facebook) to read all about the process, but here’s the key summary slide 31:

fb-internal-ipv6

Those statistics are:

  • 100% of  hosts they care about respond on IPv6  (Hosts that are not IPv6 ready are going away.)
  • 75% of internal traffic is now IPv6 with a goal to be at 100% by Q3 2014 or earlier
  • 98% of traffic in and out of HHVM is IPv6
  • 100% of our memcache traffic is IPv6
  • A goal of being 100% IPv6-only in 2-3 years

Very impressive to see!  Paul’s presentation is worth viewing because he outlines the challenges that Facebook faced from dealing with vendor equipment to getting developers to use IPv6.  It’s a great case study that we’ve added to our IPv6 case studies page.  We wrote about this presentation back in March, but it’s worth repeating today on World IPv6 Launchiversary #2.

Facebook very clearly understands the need to move to the production version of the Internet – and they are taking steps to ensure that their site and services will be available to the next 5 billion people who come online!  They are going to be out in front of most other companies with having made the transition over to IPv6.

What are you waiting for?  Visit our “Start Here” page or  check out our IPv6 resources  – and let us know if there is anything more we can do to help you!

Mexico’s AXTEL Provides Excellent IPv6 Lessons Learned And Recommendations

What are the key lessons AXTEL, Mexico’s second-largest telecommunications operator, learned in deploying IPv6 across their network?  What did they do?  What do they wish they’d known before they got started?  In an excellent case study we’ve published from AXTEL this week, they walk through the phases they went through in planning their deployment of IPv6 and then get into their lessons learned and recommendations. Their slides are available for viewing:

AXTEL IPv6 case study cover image

As far as the lessons they’ve learned, their “In Retrospective” section states that if they could return to the beginning of their IPv6 project, they wish they could have had:

  • More insight regarding how each of our different equipment providers were doing towards their evolution to IPv6.
  • The possibility to talk to another provider that had already implemented IPv6 in their network and learn from their experiences.
  • Support from our providers with people/team that had hands-on experience in an IPv6 evolution project.
  • To have had IPv6 support, even years before the beginning of the project; as a required functionality in all or our network and IT equipment requirements.

The advantage to people starting now is that there are examples of service providers who have implemented IPv6 and there are people who other service providers can speak with.  To that point, Cesar Joel Ramirez Garcia, an author of this case study from Axtell, said in a message that he’s glad to receive questions from other network operators about what they’ve done.

In the case study they go on to provide their recommendations for other companies seeking to move to IPv6:

  1. Communicate to all company levels the urgency and importance of IPv6 evolution.
  2. IPv6 is a primarily a business continuity case.
  3. Test in a lab environment all your IPv6 deployment scenarios
  4. Begin IPv6 training in all the different technical, sales and marketing teams ASAP.
  5. Evaluate the necessity of running a network audit or assessment to know where your network stands regarding IPv6.
  6. Join in technology forums and ask other people about their experience in the IPv6 evolution.
  7. Work closely with your equipment providers.
  8. Implement double stack wherever possible.
  9. Avoid NAT techniques wherever possible.
  10. Don’t be afraid of the IPv6 transition; as with many things the beginning is the toughest part.

These are great recommendations and we certainly commend Cesar and the rest of the AXTEL team on the work they have done so far as well as the work they are continuing to look at about how to expand IPv6 further in their networks.  Now that they have business and VPN customers using IPv6 they are now looking at the best ways to get IPv6 connectivity to all their residential customers.  All of that will help Mexico move ahead in having an Internet that will work even better in the future as more people and devices come online!

What are you waiting for?   If you would like to join AXTEL and many other service providers with moving to the production Internet, please visit our IPv6 resources or begin with our “Start Here” page to help find resources most appropriate for your type of organization.

Congratulations, again, to AXTEL for both their deployment of IPv6 as well as their willingness to share their story so that others may learn! Thank you!

Check Out These 7 New IPv6 Case Studies! And Watch For More Tomorrow…

World IPv6 Launch LogoHave you checked out the growing list of IPv6 case studies we are publishing?   We’ve added seven more in the past few days, including the excellent example from RCS&RDS in Romania … and also some outstanding ”lessons learned” and recommendations for network operator Axtell in Mexico.  Plus CERN, UCD, Forthnet and more…

And tomorrow, as we celebrate the 2nd anniversary of World IPv6 Launch, we’ll be putting out even more case studies – all to help people understand that IPv6 is very real and people are making the move today!

Have you already made the move to IPv6?  If so, would you be interested in publishing a case study in some form?  (Please let us know!)

If you haven’t made the move yet… what are you waiting for?  Check out our “Start Here” page and find the resources that may help you make the move soon!

Why And How Did RCS&RDS, Romania’s Largest ISP, Deploy IPv6?

Romania IPv6 usageWhy did RCS&RDS, Romania’s broadband market leader, deploy IPv6 in their network?  How did they do it?  What did they have to do?  And what were the results they saw?

In this excellent case study provided to us by Liviu Pislaru, the Chief Architect for IPv6 for RCS&RDS, he answers all of those questions and much more.

I want to pull out a couple of specific points, in particular his answer to why they did this:

The trigger for IPv6 deployment wasn’t IPv4 depletion. We still have plenty of IPv4 addresses and this is gold nowadays. We wanted our engineers to gain experience with IPv6 when the size of the IPv6 internet was less the 1% and chances to affect customer services was minimised.

They went ahead now because they knew that sooner or later they would need to make the transition… and wanted to get the experience before it became critical for them to have it.  As Liviu notes, they were ready for World IPv6 Launch in 2012 and rapidly became one of the leaders globally in IPv6 adoption.

Now, for people looking at this today, the global IPv6 Internet has already grown past 1% by any of the statistics sites such as Google’s IPv6 stats… but Liviu’s point is a good one – NOW is the time to gain the experience before you need to do so!

Liviu notes how much traffic they now see over IPv6:

Nowadays our IPv6 traffic goes to 30-35G in peak time, mainly because there’s more IPv6 content on the Internet. Our measurements show that 25% of a dual stack residential customer traffic is IPv6 traffic.

This is consistent with what we’ve heard from other ISPs (some of home have even said higher values such as 40%) and makes sense when you realize that many of the sites that home users would visit are all IPv6-enabled, such as all of Google’s properties (including YouTube), Facebook, Wikipedia, Yahoo, Bing, Netflix and more.

While they had great initial success in 2012, the rate of IPv6 adoption has not climbed greatly in Romania and Liviu gets into some of the reasons he believes this hasn’t happened. He also provides a link to a site where you can monitor the status of IPv6 on RCS&RDS’ network.

All in all it is an excellent case study and I would strongly encourage you to read it! Thank you to Liviu for providing us this case study and for all of his hard work there in Romania bringing about this great level of IPv6 deployment!


Interested in more stories of IPv6 deployment?  Check out our IPv6 case studies page – and if you want to get started with your own transition to IPv6, look at our “Start Here” page to find IPv6 resources most appropriate to your type of organization.