Category: IPv6

IPv6

Listen to the Hedge Podcast 39 to Learn about the Open Standards Everywhere Project

logo from the Hedge podcast episode 39 featuring Dan York and open standards everywhere

What is our Open Standards Everywhere (OSE) project all about? How did it get started? What are the project goals? What are some of the challenges web server operators face? How can we work together to make web servers more secure and available?

Recently Russ White and his team interviewed me on The Hedge Podcast Episode 39 to discuss all these questions and much more. I’ve known Russ for a good number of years and it was fun to talk with him and his co-hosts Eyvonne Sharp and Tom Ammon about all things related to the OSE project. I hope you enjoy listening to the episode as much as we enjoyed having the conversation!

Listen now

I would encourage you to listen to some of the other Hedge podcast episodes, too, as they have some great content. A few I personally enjoyed included: episode 37 about DNS privacy; episode 31 about network operator groups (NOGs); and episode 30 with Ethan Banks from the Packet Pushers Network about why understanding the fundamentals of networking is so important.

Thank you to Russ, Eyvonne, and Tom for having me on the show!

Want to be more involved with the Open Standards Everywhere project?

The post Listen to the Hedge Podcast 39 to Learn about the Open Standards Everywhere Project appeared first on Internet Society.

On this 8th World IPv6 Launchiversary, Help Us Get More Websites Available Over IPv6

chart showing IPv6 statistics from Google that have gone from near 1% in 2012 to over 30% in 2020

Eight years ago, on June 6, 2012, thousands of companies and organizations came together as part of World IPv6 Launch to permanently enable IPv6 for their websites and networks.

Today, we can see the success! If you visit the World IPv6 Launch measurements site, you can see some amazing numbers:

  • Reliance Jio’s network in India has over 90% IPv6 deployment!
  • Comcast’s huge network in the US is at 73% IPv6.
  • The combined US wireless carriers are over 85% IPv6.
  • Deutsche Telekom is over 68% IPv6.
  • Claro in Brazil is at 62% IPv6.

Another major source of info, Google’s IPv6 statistics, show that over 30% of all traffic to Googles sites globally is now over IPv6. If you look at Google’s per-country IPv6 adoption, some countries are seeing up around 50% of all traffic to Google’s properties going over IPv6.

This is all fantastic to see. But of course, we want more IPv6 deployment!

Specifically, we want more web sites and services available over IPv6. Increasing numbers of IPv6-only mobile networks are being deployed around the world. To ensure that people can reach websites that are still only available over IPv4, many IPv6-only networks use IPv6-to-IPv4 gateways. But we want everyone to be able to reach every website as fast as possible, without having to go through gateways, which can slow down access. So, we need more sites to have native IPv6 connections.

To do this, we need your help!

Is your site IPv6-ready? First, you can test your own web site(s) with the Internet.nl test site.

If Internet.nl says your site already supports IPv6, then congratulations! You are all set to have people connect over IPv6 to your site.

If your site does not support IPv6 yet, as part of our Open Standards Everywhere project in 2020, we are providing documentation to help people operating web servers make their sites available over IPv6.

We would like your feedback on the documents we have so far.

If you operate your own web server running on an actual server or a virtual machine, we have instructions for Apache or NGINX web servers.

If you are using a content delivery network (CDN) in front of your web server, the reality is that many CDNs already support IPv6 by default. We have a list of CDNs we know support IPv6. If your CDN is not on the list, please let us know! And if your CDN does not support IPv6, please let them know that these other CDNs do – and perhaps that you might consider switching. 😉

If you host your web site with a web hosting provider, we are looking to build a list of web hosting providers who do and do not support IPv6 for websites. We have an open issue on GitHub where we are seeking input.

In all of these cases, we would appreciate your feedback. If you use GitHub, you can open a new issue (or reply to a current one). Alternatively, you can send me email or contact me on Twitter.)

With your help, we can create even stronger documentation that can help even more people make their sites available over IPv6!

Want to be more involved with the Open Standards Everywhere project?

The post On this 8th World IPv6 Launchiversary, Help Us Get More Websites Available Over IPv6 appeared first on Internet Society.

On the 7th World IPv6 Launchiversary, How About Listening to a Podcast About IPv6?

photo of a bee

On this 7th “launchiversary” of World IPv6 Launch, I thought I’d share a way I’ve enjoyed learning more about IPv6 over the past year. I like listening to podcasts while I’m running or driving, and a show that’s in my playlist is “IPv6 Buzz” where IPv6 veterans Ed Horley, Scott Hogg, and Tom Coffeen “dive into the 128-bit address space wormhole.

IPv6 buzz podcast logo

Anyone working with IPv6 for any amount of time, and particularly IPv6 advocacy, has probably read or heard something from Ed, Scott, or Tom. They’ve been explaining and promoting IPv6 for a long time in their own individual endeavors.

This podcast, which launched one year ago today, brings the three of them together with a wide range of guests from across the industry. Even with all my own years of IPv6 activity, I’ve learned a great amount about IPv6 security, recent drivers of deployment (including state task forces), tools and suggestions for promoting IPv6 growth. They dove deeply into IPv6 inside the IETF with Fred Baker, talked about going IPv6-only with Veronika McKillop of Microsoft, got into Happy Eyeballs with Dan Wing, and most recently explored enterprise IPv6 issues with Enno Rey.

Part of the excellent “Packet Pushers” network of podcasts, I’ve found it a great way to stay up on what is happening in the world of IPv6. If you listen to podcasts and are interested in IPv6, do check it out!

P.S. And if you have not yet started deploying IPv6, you can begin by exploring some of our Deploy360 resources.


Image Credit: Boris Smokrovic on Unsplash

The post On the 7th World IPv6 Launchiversary, How About Listening to a Podcast About IPv6? appeared first on Internet Society.

Video – Vint Cerf on the 6th anniversary of World IPv6 Launch and why IPv6 is so critical now

Today, on the sixth anniversary of World IPv6 Launch, Vint Cerf, co-designer of the TCP/IP protocol and a “Father of the Internet”, sent us this video message to share with you all:

To learn more about IPv6, read our State of IPv6 Deployment 2018. And if you have not yet started, visit our Deploy360 IPv6 resources to learn how you can begin.

The post Video – Vint Cerf on the 6th anniversary of World IPv6 Launch and why IPv6 is so critical now appeared first on Internet Society.

New “State of IPv6 Deployment 2017” Shows 3000% Growth over 5 Years

State of IPv6 coverIn the 5 years since World IPv6 Launch, IPv6 deployment has grown over 3,000 percent! Now there are over 37 countries with more than 5% deployment of IPv6. In the USA, where I live, IPv6 deployment is up over 30% … sometimes close to 35%.

These are all statistics out of the new “State of IPv6 Deployment 2017” report published by colleagues of mine at the Internet Society on this fifth “Launchiversary” of World IPv6 Launch back in 2012.

A key point in the document is that enterprise networks are often the ones lagging farthest behind in deployment of IPv6. Mobile networks are far ahead in many locations, and residential broadband networks are also often very far behind.

One reasons some enterprises struggle is that they have custom applications that need to be migrated to work on IPv6. That was really the reason why I originally wrote this very short book back in 2011 – to help developers understand what they need to be thinking about to move their apps over to work on IPv6.

There are many more resources available in the time since I first wrote the book, including ARIN’s guide on “Preparing Applications for IPv6“. The key point coming out of this “State of IPv6 Deployment 2017” report today is that the time is now to make the move to IPv6!  Start the migration… NOW!

If you are trying to get your management or others in your organization to move ahead with IPv6, download this State of IPv6 Deployment 2017 report and send it around – or send the link around. Hopefully the information inside can help you make the case that the time to move to IPv6 is NOW.


An audio podcast on this topic is also available:

New “State of IPv6 Deployment 2017” Shows 3000% Growth over 5 Years

State of IPv6 coverIn the 5 years since World IPv6 Launch, IPv6 deployment has grown over 3,000 percent! Now there are over 37 countries with more than 5% deployment of IPv6. In the USA, where I live, IPv6 deployment is up over 30% … sometimes close to 35%.

These are all statistics out of the new “State of IPv6 Deployment 2017” report published by colleagues of mine at the Internet Society on this fifth “Launchiversary” of World IPv6 Launch back in 2012.

A key point in the document is that enterprise networks are often the ones lagging farthest behind in deployment of IPv6. Mobile networks are far ahead in many locations, and residential broadband networks are also often very far behind.

One reasons some enterprises struggle is that they have custom applications that need to be migrated to work on IPv6. That was really the reason why I originally wrote this short book back in 2011 – to help developers understand what they need to be thinking about to move their apps over to work on IPv6.

There are many more resources available in the time since I first wrote the book, including ARIN’s guide on “Preparing Applications for IPv6“. The key point coming out of this “State of IPv6 Deployment 2017” report today is that the time is now to make the move to IPv6!  Start the migration… NOW!

If you are trying to get your management or others in your organization to move ahead with IPv6, download this State of IPv6 Deployment 2017 report and send it around – or send the link around. Hopefully the information inside can help you make the case that the time to move to IPv6 is NOW.


An audio podcast on this topic is also available:

IAB Warns That Internet Standards Will No Longer Be Based on IPv4, only IPv6

Internet architecture boardThis month the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) provided another reason for organizations to think more about migrating their applications and services to IPv6. In a strong statement, the IAB warned other standards development organizations (SDOs) that future standards from the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) may no longer support IPv4:

The IAB expects that the IETF will stop requiring IPv4 compatibility in new or extended protocols. Future IETF protocol work will then optimize for and depend on IPv6.

This will not happen immediately, of course, but the IAB statement notes that levels of IPv6 deployment are increasing and that SDOs need to ensure that current and future standards can work in an IPv6-only environment.

The key point for organizations and companies with applications is that you need to be seriously thinking about ensuring that your apps can work in IPv6-only networks.

To prepare, I would of course welcome you to buy the book, but there are also resources available online that can help you get started. The important thing is to get started NOW!

IAB Warns That Internet Standards Will No Longer Be Based on IPv4, only IPv6

Internet architecture boardThis month the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) provided another reason for organizations to think more about migrating their applications and services to IPv6. In a strong statement, the IAB warned other standards development organizations (SDOs) that future standards from the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) may no longer support IPv4:

The IAB expects that the IETF will stop requiring IPv4 compatibility in new or extended protocols. Future IETF protocol work will then optimize for and depend on IPv6.

This will not happen immediately, of course, but the IAB statement notes that levels of IPv6 deployment are increasing and that SDOs need to ensure that current and future standards can work in an IPv6-only environment.

The key point for organizations and companies with applications is that you need to be seriously thinking about ensuring that your apps can work in IPv6-only networks.

To prepare, I would of course welcome you to buy the book, but there are also resources available online that can help you get started. The important thing is to get started NOW!

IAB Warns That All Networking Standards Need To Fully Support IPv6

IPv6This week the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) issued a strong statement warning that any networking standards developed by Standards Development Organizations (SDOs) need to fully support IPv6.

The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is of course the major SDO developing networking standards for the Internet, but many other standards organizations base their standards on IETF standards. 

For instance, any organizations creating standards that work over the Internet rely on the underlying Internet Protocol (IP) and many other associated standards.

Noting that IPv6 deployment levels continue to increase (ex. see Google IPv6 stats), and that increasingly IPv6-only networks are being deployed, the IAB has now stated:

The IAB expects that the IETF will stop requiring IPv4 compatibility in new or extended protocols. Future IETF protocol work will then optimize for and depend on IPv6.

The IAB goes on to say:

We recommend that all networking standards assume the use of IPv6, and be written so they do not require IPv4. We recommend that existing standards be reviewed to ensure they will work with IPv6, and use IPv6 examples.

The IAB goes on to encourage the industry and others to develop strategies for systems – and standards – to work in an IPv6-only environment.

The key point here is that the IAB is saying that IPv6 deployment is at the point where organizations developing standards can no longer rely on IPv4 being available. Standards that rely on IP need to be reviewed to make sure they can work over IPv6. And new standards need to assume that IPv6 will be the default in an increasing number of networks.

This is good to see – and we certainly hope that all SDOs will take these recommendations seriously and ensure that all their standards will work over IPv6.

Please do read the full IAB statement – and then if you have not already started working with IPv6, please visit our Start Here page to get started!


P.S. There were good discussions of this news on Hacker News and Reddit for those who participate on those sites.

Facebook, Akamai Pass Major Milestone: Over 50% IPv6 from US mobile networks

Wednesday was a major milestone for Facebook. For the first time, more people connected over IPv6 than IPv4 from the four major US mobile networks! Facebook’s Paul Saab wrote about this on (where else?) Facebook:

facebook-ipv6-50percent-mobilenetworks

His text:

Today marks the first day that more people used IPv6 to access Facebook than IPv4 from the 4 major USA mobile networks. This is a huge milestone in just 4 short years since World IPv6 Launch in 2012.

Similarly, Erik Nygren at Akamai updated an earlier post last week with a similar view:

As an update as of August 10th, there has been significant growth over the past three months and deployment has crossed a major milestone: over half of requests to dual-stacked sites on Akamai from the top-4 US mobile networks now use IPv6! IPv6 is used around 70% of the time for Android and over 30% of the time for iPhones, up 10% each from May. We have also seen T-Mobile start to deploy IPv6 to iOS devices as well in a dual-stacked configuration.

Today over on the World IPv6 Launch blog, Mat Ford wrote that he is seeing this same milestone in the World IPv6 Launch measurements. The four major US mobile networks of Verizon Wireless, T-Mobile USA, Sprint Wireless and AT&T are seeing a combined measurement of close to 55% IPv6.  His chart:

World IPv6 Launch statistics

All of this shows the very real progress being made in IPv6 deployment.  If you have not started your plans to make your networks, applications and services available over IPv6, what are you waiting for?

To get started, please visit our Start Here page to find resources to help!